Jeroen Cremers

Sentinel I 2022

Ceramics cardboard, old

100x 135 x 110 cm

In Cremers' surrealistic dreamscape, various influences melt together into a new world image in which modernist stylistic influences connect and merge effortlessly with the history of ancient Egypt or other cultures of antiquity.
Alienation and transformation are two concepts that spring to mind when looking at the new work of Jeroen Cremers. The sculptures can be recognised by their bodies
with weathered surfaces and infestations.
Recently, Cremers has been looking at the dystopian works he depicts with different eyes. Corona shook everything up. Because of the great changes and uncertainties, his work seemed almost to have had foresight. This new situation had a great influence on his new visual language but also on the material.
After years of working mainly in cardboard, he returned to an old love: ceramics. He let go of the fear that the material would break down in the kiln, thus opening the door to expression, coincidence and surprise, with unexpected deformations and structures as a result.
Working with a factor of uncertainty fits in seamlessly with the now so topical theme of his sculp-tures: 'They are part of a world turned upside down by a drastic change or an intangible danger'.

Artist bio:

In Cremers' surrealistic dreamscape, various influences melt together into a new world image in which modernist stylistic influences connect and merge effortlessly with the history of ancient Egypt or other cultures of antiquity.
Alienation and transformation are two concepts that spring to mind when looking at the new work of Jeroen Cremers. The sculptures can be recognised by their bodies
with weathered surfaces and infestations.
Recently, Cremers has been looking at the dystopian works he depicts with different eyes. Corona shook everything up. Because of the great changes and uncertainties, his work seemed almost to have had foresight. This new situation had a great influence on his new visual language but also on the material.
After years of working mainly in cardboard, he returned to an old love: ceramics. He let go of the fear that the material would break down in the kiln, thus opening the door to expression, coincidence and surprise, with unexpected deformations and structures as a result.
Working with a factor of uncertainty fits in seamlessly with the now so topical theme of his sculp-tures: 'They are part of a world turned upside down by a drastic change or an intangible danger'.